A dead white-tailed sea eagle has been discovered on the Isle of Skye.

The death is currently being dealt with as non-suspicious and most likely to be of natural causes.

The bird's remains were reported in the Dunvegan area.  

A spokesperson for Polce Scotland said: "Police Scotland received a report of a sea eagle found dead near Dunvegan on Skye on Friday, April 27.

"The cause of death is pending a post mortem of the carcass."

 

 

A teddy bear lost in Staffin earlier this month is waiting to be claimed.

The bear, who sports a Station Master cap, was discovered on the verge north of the Staffin Hall and shop.

The bear was rescued and is currently in the safe-keeping of the Staffin, Isle of Skye Facebook page team.

Plans are being put in place by The Highland Council for the next phase of works to the rock face at the A890 Stromeferry Bypass.

Essential stabilisation works will begin on 3rd September 2018 on a 72 metre section of rock face close to the west of the avalanche shelter.

The rock face is in a single track road section, immediately adjacent to the railway track.

Highland Council have warned against algal toxins in Skye and Lochaber shellfish.

The Highland Council's Environmental Health team has identified raised levels of naturally occurring algal toxins following routine monitoring at Loch Eishort in Skye and Loch Beag in Lochaber.

Eating shellfish such as cockles, mussels, oysters or razor fish from these areas may pose a health risk arising from the consumption of these algal toxins.

As a sensible precaution, Highland Council have advised people to avoid eating shellfish from this area until further notice, noting that cooking does not remove risks from consumption.

Commercial shellfish harvesters in the area have been contacted by the Council.

Gaelic-speakers will have a chance to recommend names for common marine molluscs.

A public consultation has been launched to choose Gaelic names for Scotland's shellfish.

The Scottish Natural Heritage has published a list of 85 marine mollusc names, Gaelic terms for parts of the animals and for different seashell shapes.

The recommendations have been produced by a team from Scottish Natural Heritage and Bòrd na Gàidhlig.

Gaelic-speaking environmental educator Roddy Maclean has been leading the project.  He interviewed 14 older Gaelic speakers, mostly from the Western Isles, to obtain guidance on the names they use for marine mollusc species.

Mr Maclean said: "There was a general agreement on the names for the most common species.

Pupils from Portree, Staffin and Kilmuir Primary Schools have over the last year engaged in a project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) Stories, Stones and Bones initiative. This was managed and run by Cleas, a local charity and arts organisation,

in partnership with The Aros Centre, Staffin Community Trust and Canan Graphic Studies at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig.

The project was designed to give pupils access to sites of historical interest within the environment utilising the skills and knowledge of local historians, writers and artists.

A troupe of Gaelic-speaking Bollywood dancers from Staffin are set to perform at Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival.

Six years ago, Davinder and Sonia Gill moved from London to run Mackenzie stores.  Before moving, Sonia was a dancer in Bhangra and Bollywood groups and performed all over the UK in many shows including at the Dome in Birmingham for the Bhangra Awards.

Staffin Bollywood started as a fund-raiser for the SkyeDance Festival.  Sonia says they are now looking into fusing Gaelic songs with Bollywood music. The first dance performances in this genre could be at Belladrum this year.
 
"I go through the different styles of dance when teaching, not only Bollywood as it is important for them to have versatility when dancing," says Sonia.  "The kids learn about Indian culture, food, clothes, music, traditions - and of course dance as there are so many variations of dance - giving a different visual result. I learn from them as well - everyday is a lesson."

St John Scotland will officially transfer ownership of two Mountain Rescue bases on Skye to the team.
 
The Skye bases, in Glenbrittle and Sligachan, are the eight and ninth bases of thirteen to be gifted from St John Scotland to the teams themselves. The cost of these bases has now topped £2 million and, until now, were provided to the teams under licence and rent free.
 
Gerry Akroyd MBE, Skye Mountain Rescue Team Leader, said: “Without the help of St John Scotland, we would never have been able to fund the two bases on Skye, plus the two vehicles which they have also provided. It has all made our life a lost easier on rescues and training.”

Three familiar Skye faces could be seen running in the London Marathon.

Jeremy Rossiter completed the race in 2 hours, 40 minutes and 27 seconds.  He told The Skye Times: "I finished 154 out of 40,000 over all and 18 out of just over 4,000 in my age group.

"I was quite surprised."

He described the racing conditions as "oppressive," saying: "It was unbearable in some parts.

"About mile 21, I didn't think I was going to finish.

"It was 24 degrees, but much warmer with the crowds.

"In the second half, I was increasingly aware that I was overtaking a few people.  Apparently, in the last 10k, I overtook 125 people.

Do you have information or images of Skye Camanachd volunteers?  If so, a shinty art project requires your help!

Highland Print Studio Manager, John McNaught, has been working with Skye Camanachd on a Studio project entitled Throw Up 20.18.  As well as documenting his time with the club photographically, he is also producing a series of hand-produced prints at the Studio.

Along with the work of three other artists at Beauly Shinty Club, Newtonmore Camanachd Club and Fort William Shinty Club, the work will form a touring exhibition, with its debut at the 2018 Camanachd Cup Final in Oban.